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‘That’s good news to us and that’s all the fishermen ever wanted,’ says fishermen’s association president

Lobster fishermen on Nova Scotia’s Eastern Shore say they are relieved to learn the federal government’s plan to establish a marine-protection area in the waters along their coast won’t hurt the local fishery.

“That’s good news to us and that’s all the fishermen ever wanted, but we’re still concerned about the designation and the management of it going forward,” said Peter Connors, president of Eastern Shore Fisherman’s Protective Association.

“We certainly aren’t against the protection of the area here, and we’ve been working hard and spending a lot of money for years to help with conservation and protection.”

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans is in the early stages of working out the logistics of protecting 2,000 square kilometres of water between the communities of Clam Harbour and Liscomb Point.

 

 

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Anglers will learn Monday whether there will be an open season for red snapper off the Atlantic Coast next month, which would be one of the few opportunities to harvest the highly-sought fish since strict protections went into effect in 2010.

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, which sets fishing regulations in federal waters off the Southeast coast, will consider several options during its meeting in Charleston, S.C., that would open red snapper Oct. 6 and last anywhere from seven to 23 days spread over three-day weekends.

 

 

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Saturday (Sept. 23) is a “free fishing day” in New York State, meaning residents and non-residents can fish for free on any of the state’s freshwaters without a fishing license.

The day is one of four new, free fishing days that have been added as part of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative.

 

 

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A report on cameras on fishing boats, dismissed by Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy, had been described as “robust” by a top ministry science advisor, emails show.

It raised doubts about whether camera technology on fishing boats would be much use in court as evidence of illegal fishing.

MPI later called the report “misleading” and poor quality, and Mr Guy said scientists had binned it.

But in emails released to the Green Party under the Official Information Act, a top science advisor described the report as “robust and sound”.

The emails also show the controversial report, written in 2015, was done after two MPI forensic investigators decided unilaterally to test fishing boat cameras. They analysed pictures of snapper taken during a trial of cameras on fishing trawlers operating between Cape Reinga and the East Cape.

 

 

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Lake Palestine will serve as the site for a Texas High School Bass Association East Division fishing tournament on Saturday. This body of water will be fished twice during the regular-season slate.

BULLARD — High school bass fishing is growing in popularity, and you don’t have to leave the Trinity Valley to experience the growth.

Palestine, Oakwood and Elkhart are among the new high schools that have fielded fishing teams this season.

All three schools will join Frankston at the Texas High School Bass Association East Division tournament set for Saturday at Lake Palestine.

 The first cast is set for 6:45 a.m., and Bullard High School is serving as the tournament host.

“It has blown up,” said current Frankston team advisor Ryan McCoy. “Frankston started it four years ago. We had an average of 80 teams per tournament, but now it’s up to 200 two-man teams. That’s 400 student anglers.”

 

 

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ON THE SHORELINE OF THE DELAWARE RIVER — “I don’t pull trout out of a hole,” said Ed Tansue, “it was trout that pulled me out of a hole.”

Tansue, who lives in Saylorsburg, Pa., was awaiting a trip down a section of the Delaware River in a drift boat, fly-casting for whatever might be there.

Tansue was among 10 participants in Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, and spent a day on the river as guests of the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

The program, founded in 2005 by a retired U.S. Navy captain, “is dedicated to the physical and emotional rehabilitation of disabled active military service personnel and disabled veterans through fly fishing and associated activities including education and outings.”

That’s the formal statement from the group’s website (www.projecthealingwaters.org.)

It hits home a little harder when the idea of the group is spoken by one of the project coordinators, John Rocchio: “Trout live in very lovely places.”

A Vietnam Era veteran, Rocchio helps put together events such as the fishing trip earlier this week.

Nine of the group are from Pennsylvania and one came from Dover, Del. The Pocono Environmental Education Center, located within the national park, provided room and board for the trip.

 

 

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LONDON: More than a third of migrant fishermen in Thailand clearly were victims of trafficking over the past five years and even more workers in the industry were possibly trafficked as well, according to a report published on Thursday.

Routinely underpaid and physically abused, three-quarters of migrants working on Thai fishing vessels have been in debt bondage, working to pay off an obligation, said the study by the anti-trafficking group International Justice Mission (IJM) and the Bangkok-based Issara Institute, an anti-trafficking NGO.

(IJM’s website is here and the Issara Institute’s is here. The report cited in this story can be read and downloaded here or [PDF link] here.

Thailand’s multi-billion dollar seafood sector came under fire in recent years after investigations showed widespread slavery, trafficking and violence on fishing boats and in onshore food processing factories.

The politically unstable country, which is under military rule, has vowed to crack down on trafficking and recently introduced reforms to its fisheries law.

 

 

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Tiger muskies are among the fish DWR biologists have released into Scofield Reservoir. Biologists hope the fast-growing muskie will help control Utah chubs that have taken over much of the reservoir. (Photo by Morgan Jacobsen, Utah DWR)

SCOFIELD — After an extensive public input process, the Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR) has adopted a new management plan for the fishery at Scofield Reservoir.

The plan, which was presented to the Central and Southeastern regional advisory councils in July, includes introducing three new fish species to the reservoir — wiper, tiger muskie and sterile walleye.

Placing the three species in the reservoir will give anglers new fishing opportunities and hopefully help fishing remain good for years to come.

Scofield’s history

For decades, Scofield Reservoir was known as a great place to take the family fishing for rainbow trout. For a time, the reservoir was even listed among Utah’s Blue Ribbon fishing waters, some of the best fishing waters in the state.

The presence of Utah chub has caused angler satisfaction to decline in recent years, though. Utah chub reproduce prolifically and out-compete rainbow trout for food and space. The chub were likely introduced to the reservoir illegally.

The chub problem is not a new problem at Scofield. For decades, aquatics managers have used rotenone, a chemical that kills fish, to remove Utah chub from the reservoir.

 

 

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Two brothers were amazed to accidentally capture the moment their boat was nearly capsized by a huge humpback whale.

Two brothers taking their new boat out fishing for the first time were amazed to accidentally capture the moment it was nearly capsized by a huge humpback whale.

Jason Cullen got the shock of his life when the mammal unexpectedly breached just metres in front of him while he was trying to film another whale in the far distance.

The gobsmacked 27-year-old and brother Ben, 26, believe the 15-metre (49ft) humpback calf was ‘showing off’ when it deliberately launched itself from the water near Keppel Island, Queensland, Australia, this week – leaving their five-metre vessel rocking wildly.

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WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of the Interior announced a new report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that shows that 101.6 million Americans — 40 percent of the U.S. population 16 years old and older — participated in wildlife-related activities in 2016, such as hunting, fishing, and wildlife-watching.

The survey illustrates gains in wildlife watching — particularly around the home — and fishing, with moderate declines in the number of hunters nationally. The findings reflect a continued interest in engaging in the outdoors. These activities are drivers behind an economic powerhouse, where participants spent $156 billion — the most in the last 25 years, adjusted for inflation.

This report absolutely underscores the need to increase public access to public lands across the United States,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Hunting and fishing are a part of the American heritage. As a kid who grew up hunting and fishing on public lands who later took my own kids out on the same land, I know how important it is to expand access for future generations. Many folks east of the Mississippi River rely on friends with large acreages or pay high rates for hunting and fishing clubs. This makes access to wildlife refuges and other public lands more important.”

On his first day in office, Secretary Zinke reversed an order that would have banned lead ammo and tackle on National Wildlife Refuge lands, and he began the process of expanding hunting and fishing opportunities on public lands across the Department.

 

 

 

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