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Upstate New York is a magnet during the fall for anglers from across the state and beyond who take advantage of the superb, Alaska-like  fishing opportunities in Lake Ontario tributaries for spawning Chinook and coho salmon. Want to catch a big salmon? The following are 10 of the most popular waterways, according to the state Department of Environmental Conservation, fishing guides and others interviewed by NYup.com

Corey Swietzer, of Binghamton, caught this Chinook salmon on the Salmon River out of the “town pool” in Pulaski. He caught it on a soft plastic pink egg.

 

 

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Visitors take a boat ride in the backwaters

KOCHI: The Kerala Matsyafed has scripted another success story as its renovated aqua fish farm at Njarakkal is attracting huge crowd. It offers them a blend of farm fishing, sight seeing and a variety of fish delicacies.Just a few days into its inauguration, the farm, situated in the middle of 45-acre backwaters  is buzzing, with nearly 600 visitors turning up on weekends. A bamboo hut, small bowl boats (kutta vanchi), cuisine package for visitors as well as angling opportunity for novices and experienced enthusiasts are some major attractions.

“The bamboo hut is intended for families who want to spend time in the middle of backwaters. At present, one can spend up to one hour inside the hut, but we’re planning to increase it to two hours. Currently, we’ve only one hut which can accommodate 40 persons, but another one will be opened by this weekend,” said farm manager P Nisha. The entry fee at the farm, which functions from 10am to 6pm, is Rs 200. “It includes charges for a welcome drink, 30 minutes’ bowl boat rowing, angling and fish-curry meals. Visiting the farm between 3 pm and 6 pm, however, will cost only Rs 100 per ticket, but food won’t be part of the package,” she said. Home-made snacks and tea are served at the evening restaurant, managed by an eight-member team from Souparnika self-help group.

 

 

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New trout regulations apply in some Victorian waters.

Changes include a 25cm minimum size and a reduced bag limit from five to three for the Ovens River (upstream of Porepunkah Bridge); Mitta Mitta River (upstream of Lake Dartmouth); Nariel Creek (upstream of Colac Colac bridge), and the Rubicon River.

Moreover, there is now a 45cm minimum size for brown trout and a 30cm minimum size for rainbow trout in Lake Toolondo, with a bag limit of three trout a day.

Hepburn Lagoon has a 45cm minimum size and a three-trout bag limit, and the closed trout season no longer applies to the Hopkins and Merri rivers.

Jim Credlin reports yellowbelly are being caught in the Murray on shrimp, yabbie and scrubworm; top spots include Kenley, Wood Wood and Swan Hill.

The Wakool and Edward Rivers are also producing yellowbelly.

Gary Constantine reports the Rubicon, Acheron and Goulburn Rivers are producing brook trout to 800g.

The Goulburn also has brown trout to 2.3kg. Most fish are being caught on scrubworms and lures.

 

 

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Minor changes to freshwater fishing regulations became effective Sept. 1.

They include establishing a catch-and-release only rule for largemouth bass and sunfish in Bedford Boys Ranch (Tarrant County), adding Alabama bass to the list of Texas game fish and updating bass regulations for Alan Henry Reservoir to reflect the change. Another change: Modifying largemouth and smallmouth bass regulations to catch-and-release only on 38 miles of the Devils River from Baker’s Crossing to Big Satan Creek.

Saltwater fishing changes are for offshore game fish species. The minimum size limit has increased to 99 inches for scalloped, smooth and great hammerhead sharks. A minimum size of 24 inches for gag grouper and black grouper has been imposed, along with catch-and-release only fishing for Nassau grouper.

 

 

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City Park and its accompanying beach in downtown Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. CreditLeah Nash for The New York Times

The fishing rod on the starboard aft side (or back corner — I was proud of myself for learning some navigation terms) of our little vessel sprang taut, like a bowstring. Our guide, Shane Moon, jumped to his feet with a quickness I didn’t expect from a guy who looks like he could play lineman for a college football team. “O.K., we’ve got one,” he said. The sun hadn’t yet shown its face in the purplish-blue sky, but it was light out, maybe 5:30 in the morning, and dozens of boats dotted a wide section of the Columbia River where it forks. I was excited. I had gotten a fish, and it was still pretty early, so I was feeling good about the prospects for the day. The question: Would I be able to keep it?

 

 

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THERE have been some good reports of tailor in the Broadwater around the Aldershots. Try live bait off the seaway wall, either near the southern end or near the pipeline for King Fish. It’s early in the season but a few Mangrove Jacks have been caught. Flatheads are biting well this week, best method has been slow trolling off the banks up near the pin. Plenty of sand crabs around too so get your pots in the water.

IT’S open season for Bass and there should be plenty of fish around. This time of year they are heading one direction and that is upstream. Bass love these windy days we have been having as it blows insects onto the water and can create a feeding frenzy. You want a lure that looks like the insects being blown onto the water. Try Hinze Dam in the upper reaches and the lakes around Robina.

 

 

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Brian Trainor, of Boonesville, N.Y., with a nice Chinook he caught Wednesday afternoon on the Salmon River. It was caught on 10-lb test line, he said.(Special to NYup.com)

The latest on the fall salmon run on the Lake Ontario tributaries still has the Salmon River leading the pack with the most fish moving upstream from the lake due to the waterway’s cooler temperatures.

A major run Wednesday morning of Chinooks through the privately owned, Douglaston Salmon Run on the lower river was described as “epic.” There are also reports of coho being caught.

“If you’re thinking of coming up early, now is a good time,” said Malcolm Button in the Salmon River Sports Shops daily fishing report on Wednesday. The store is located in downtown Pulaski.

There are fish in other tributaries along the lake such as the Lower Niagara River and the Genesee River and sources report fishing being caught to a lesser degree.

 

 

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The United States Agency for International Development’s Oceans and Fisheries Partnership (USAID Oceans) and Inmarsat have advanced communication technology to improve fisheries catch documentation and traceability.

The move is designed to promote legal, reported and regulated fishing. Crew members on medium and large vessels will integrate existing monitoring systems and catch data with Inmarsat’s Fleet One and IsatData Pro technology, a global two-way messaging service for tracking and monitoring ports and vessels. USAID Oceans will pilot the technology in Bitung, Indonesia, and Songkhla, Thailand, where the system has been tested.

In Indonesia, Inmarsat will equip fishing vessels from participating companies with onboard satellite systems for real-time electronic voice and data exchange while at sea, consistent with Indonesia’s Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries reporting requirements. The technology will help fishing fleets to locate fish faster, improve voyage planning and reduce operational costs, says Inmarsat. Better ship-to-shore communication will enable captains to instantly track weather forecasts, thereby ensuring safer sailing and quality of life at sea.

 

 

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Marine fisheries advocate Dr Randall Bess talked to anglers in New Plymouth on improved management of recreational fishing.

A Taranaki fisherman has supported recommendations calling for closer unity between recreational and commercial sectors.

Ocean Pearl Fisheries owner Rob Ansley said both sectors already worked together in Taranaki to improve the industry in the region.

A nationwide survey is under way calling for feedback from all anglers on a list of recommendations, including licensing anglers, to protect fish stock and improve management and funding for the recreational sector.

 

 

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Technology is shrinking the vastness of the oceans to help monitor countries’ commercial fishing activities.

Transparency is a powerful tool. It improves accountability, facilitates the enforcement of laws and allows an accurate assessment of activities.

Take fishing, for instance. Fishing without transparency cannot be managed sustainably. It can’t be measured; a catch can’t be limited in a meaningful way and rules cannot be enforced. It’s too easy to cheat, and too easy to gloss over unsustainable practices. Without transparency, we would expect fishing to be unsustainable. We’d expect to see overfishing, illegal fishing, and, because of growing capacity and improved technology, massive fishery declines – even collapse in some cases. And that is exactly what we have seen: massive global collapse.

Since fishing happens largely in remote locations – far from watchful eyes – there is a physical cloak of secrecy. Our oceans, due to their size, have allowed bad actors to conceal illegal fishing activities by merely slipping over the horizon and out of sight.

 

 

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